News Flash

City of Steamboat Springs NEWS

Posted on: March 29, 2019

Spring Brings Bear Essentials & Wildlife Focus

Bears Trash NewsFlash

The Steamboat Springs Police reminds residents of the wildlife protection regulations in the City of Steamboat Springs as bears start to emerge from hibernation with the arrival of spring.

The first signs of spring bear activity have been observed and the city asks for your compliance with the Wildlife Resistant Trash Container ordinance to help keep wildlife where they belong - in the wild. Curious, intelligent, and very resourceful, black bears will explore all possible food sources and once attracted to human food sources damage property, vehicles and homes. As a result, habitual bears are relocated or euthanized.

“Trash, pet food, bird feeders and dog waste are all wildlife attractors that habituate animals to the urban interface and create potentially dangerous situations between animals and people,” said Police Commander Annette Dopplick. “Let’s all take that extra step to secure the trash can, use the bear bar on the dumpster and clean-up around the yard now so that we minimize issues over the coming months.”

All commercial properties within the city limits, including those used for special events and properties that are the site of construction activities, must use an approved wildlife resistant container at all times when the container is outdoors.

Residential requirements include storing refuse containers (if not approved wildlife resistant containers) indoors at all times except between the hours of 6:00am and 8:00pm on trash pick-up days. If a resident receives a citation, they are required to upgrade to a ‘bear-proof’ container. Businesses and residential property owners can check with their trash collection company on wildlife resistant options and services.

In additions, bears have opened vehicle doors to access food, even the smallest amounts, and can do considerable damage if trapped inside. A good practice is to lock all doors and ensure no food is left in the vehicle. 

In addition to an increased attention on bears, residents will also encounter other wildlife, such as moose, coyotes, mountain lions, foxes, skunks, raccoons and should respect the wildness of wildlife. Colorado Parks & Wildlife states that the most dangerous and potentially harmful encounters occur because people fail to leave the animals alone. Wildlife should not be harassed, captured, domesticated or fed.

“Spring is an ideal time to make sure your pets are up-to-date on vaccinations,” commented Animal Control Officer Jennifer Good. “As the snow melts, we all need to work together to enjoy our limited outdoor areas, take extra steps to clean up, lock up vehicles and respect wildlife in our area.” 

The Steamboat Springs Police seek your assistance in keeping bears and other wildlife out of trash. Local bear information may be found at the city’s website, steamboatsprings.net/bears and Colorado Parks & Wildlife, wildlife.state.co.us/bears. In addition, www.bearsmart.com and www.BeBearAware.org contain additional information.

-WeServeTheCity-

Contacts
Annette Dopplick, Commander, 970.879.4344 or email 
Jennifer Good, Animal Control Officer, 970.879.4344 or email

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